I had only been working as an intern at the Park Avenue Armory for about 3 months before being offered a humongous opportunity.[[MORE]] The Armory asked me to represent the Youth Corps Program at the 2014 ICA Boston Teen Convening Forum. ICA Teen Convening brings in teenagers from all over the country (and some from outside the country) who intern at major art institutions to discuss how they impact their institutions and represent their programs in front of the public, and for their peers.
At the time, I was scared to death of speaking on stage, but I took the opportunity anyway. I remember thinking that having this once in a lifetime chance would influence me majorly! Maybe in the process my stage fright would be terminated. Sure enough, Youth Corps put me on stage enough times that I actually began getting comfortable with being in the spotlight. With every month I began getting more and more comfortable with the idea of representing the institution because I began to feel a strong connection with everyone who worked there.
Sitting down with my co-presenter Eric Harris and working on a script for our presentation was difficult. We had to fit our experiences as Youth Corps interns, along with programs (like the band The XX or Kenneth Branagh and Rob Ashford’s Macbeth) at Park Avenue Armory all in a 10-minute presentation. Every time we did test runs we were always a minute or two too long, so we had to practice more and more to get it to the perfect length. Then soon enough, the ICA began hosting the Online Forums.
The Online Forums are for students who are going to attend the ICA Teen Convening to all have a discussion before meeting in person in Boston. The host of the forum would pose a topic question at the beginning of the conversation and the teens would build up from there. An example of a topic question they would give is “What is the civic role of a museum and how does having a large youth program at a museum impact its civic role?” I thought the civic role of the museum is to give access to its art and exhibits not only teens, but all age groups, so that anyone who is interested can come in and explore, and having a large youth program can make it more comfortable for those people. Everyone who answered the question had their own ways of viewing it as well. The Online Forums also helped us get to know the people we would be surrounded by so it can be easier to talk to each other in both a professional discussion and in a personal conversation. It worked perfectly because once we all got together in Boston nobody felt like a stranger.                                                              
                                    COMING SOON:BRIAN & HARRIS PRESENT LIVE IN ICA FORUM…

I had only been working as an intern at the Park Avenue Armory for about 3 months before being offered a humongous opportunity.

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I have lived in New York City all of my life, which also means that I rarely leave her premises. On July 25th, nine Youth Corp interns and our four supervisors went on a trip to the Wolf Conservation Center located in South Salem, New York. The crunching of the small pebbles under our shoes not only made a beautiful sound, but it made me realize that we aren’t in the city anymore. The heat from the sun felt different than the heat from the sun in the city. The air also felt cleaner and I had more energy than I usually do.
We climbed a very steep hill, which caught me really off guard. We met a very knowledgeable woman named Lois, who is a tour guide and wolf nanny (meaning she helps care for young wolves and keeps them company). We entered a wooden cabin; decorated with animals commonly found in the woods made from cardboard, a real-life figure of a coyote, and a humongous stuffed bear named Pooh. We participated in a group discussion about the overall mission of the sanctuary, facts about wolves, and numerous misconceptions humans have about the wolves. Their overall mission at the Wolf Conservation Center is to save wolves from completely going extinct and to teach people that wolves are more scared of us than we are of them. We learned that there are two types of wolves: red wolves and gray wolves. Baby wolves are born blind and deaf; and they gradually develop these two instincts as they begin to mature. We also learned that a main reason why humans are so scared of wolves is because they are used as antagonists in storybooks we read when we were younger such as “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Peter and the Wolf”, and “The Three Little Pigs”. In these tales, the wolves are the evildoers and are the enemy of the main character. These stories contribute to the continuing stigma that wolves are dangerous creatures that attack humans, which is completely untrue. Wolves are a crucial balance in nature. Without them, a whole bunch of animals will feel the shock waves from this interruption.
Afterwards, we howled like wolves to let them know that a whole bunch of us where going to visit them. We first met a five month old wolf named Nikai, who is scared of people (especially men) and never came close to the fence that separated us from him. The Conservation Center’s mission for Nikai is to train him so he could become a traveling wolf, which means that he would travel to different places and educate people that wolves pose no threat to human beings. The wolves would be brought to people who could not visit the Wolf Conservation Center. The next two wolves we visited were two brother and sister wolves named Zephyr & Alawa. Lois had a bucket of meat that the Center receives as donations from Whole Foods and fed the two eager hungry wolves. They were very excited to see us and howled back when Lois howled at them. They were way bigger than Nikai was, and they were more engaged with us as well. The final wolf we visited was a white furred wolf named Atka, who was also very large in size and completely captivated our attention. Lois also fed Atka and we found it amazing that Atka was able to crack an egg open and only eat what was inside of the egg. Out of the three, Atka was my favorite because he is a very intelligent and unique wolf, as well as a very alert animal. If I was a wolf, I would be exactly like Atka. Atka, as well as Zephyr & Alawa howled back when Lois howled at them; but it did take a little help from us to join Lois in howling along.
I was really sad leaving the Wolf Conservation Center. My favorite part of this trip was meeting Atka and the discussion that happened in the beginning of the trip at the cabin. It would be so wonderful if we could come back during the winter, while it was snowing. I would love to see wolves in the snow.
-Oscar, Phase II
Zoom Info
I have lived in New York City all of my life, which also means that I rarely leave her premises. On July 25th, nine Youth Corp interns and our four supervisors went on a trip to the Wolf Conservation Center located in South Salem, New York. The crunching of the small pebbles under our shoes not only made a beautiful sound, but it made me realize that we aren’t in the city anymore. The heat from the sun felt different than the heat from the sun in the city. The air also felt cleaner and I had more energy than I usually do.
We climbed a very steep hill, which caught me really off guard. We met a very knowledgeable woman named Lois, who is a tour guide and wolf nanny (meaning she helps care for young wolves and keeps them company). We entered a wooden cabin; decorated with animals commonly found in the woods made from cardboard, a real-life figure of a coyote, and a humongous stuffed bear named Pooh. We participated in a group discussion about the overall mission of the sanctuary, facts about wolves, and numerous misconceptions humans have about the wolves. Their overall mission at the Wolf Conservation Center is to save wolves from completely going extinct and to teach people that wolves are more scared of us than we are of them. We learned that there are two types of wolves: red wolves and gray wolves. Baby wolves are born blind and deaf; and they gradually develop these two instincts as they begin to mature. We also learned that a main reason why humans are so scared of wolves is because they are used as antagonists in storybooks we read when we were younger such as “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Peter and the Wolf”, and “The Three Little Pigs”. In these tales, the wolves are the evildoers and are the enemy of the main character. These stories contribute to the continuing stigma that wolves are dangerous creatures that attack humans, which is completely untrue. Wolves are a crucial balance in nature. Without them, a whole bunch of animals will feel the shock waves from this interruption.
Afterwards, we howled like wolves to let them know that a whole bunch of us where going to visit them. We first met a five month old wolf named Nikai, who is scared of people (especially men) and never came close to the fence that separated us from him. The Conservation Center’s mission for Nikai is to train him so he could become a traveling wolf, which means that he would travel to different places and educate people that wolves pose no threat to human beings. The wolves would be brought to people who could not visit the Wolf Conservation Center. The next two wolves we visited were two brother and sister wolves named Zephyr & Alawa. Lois had a bucket of meat that the Center receives as donations from Whole Foods and fed the two eager hungry wolves. They were very excited to see us and howled back when Lois howled at them. They were way bigger than Nikai was, and they were more engaged with us as well. The final wolf we visited was a white furred wolf named Atka, who was also very large in size and completely captivated our attention. Lois also fed Atka and we found it amazing that Atka was able to crack an egg open and only eat what was inside of the egg. Out of the three, Atka was my favorite because he is a very intelligent and unique wolf, as well as a very alert animal. If I was a wolf, I would be exactly like Atka. Atka, as well as Zephyr & Alawa howled back when Lois howled at them; but it did take a little help from us to join Lois in howling along.
I was really sad leaving the Wolf Conservation Center. My favorite part of this trip was meeting Atka and the discussion that happened in the beginning of the trip at the cabin. It would be so wonderful if we could come back during the winter, while it was snowing. I would love to see wolves in the snow.
-Oscar, Phase II
Zoom Info
I have lived in New York City all of my life, which also means that I rarely leave her premises. On July 25th, nine Youth Corp interns and our four supervisors went on a trip to the Wolf Conservation Center located in South Salem, New York. The crunching of the small pebbles under our shoes not only made a beautiful sound, but it made me realize that we aren’t in the city anymore. The heat from the sun felt different than the heat from the sun in the city. The air also felt cleaner and I had more energy than I usually do.
We climbed a very steep hill, which caught me really off guard. We met a very knowledgeable woman named Lois, who is a tour guide and wolf nanny (meaning she helps care for young wolves and keeps them company). We entered a wooden cabin; decorated with animals commonly found in the woods made from cardboard, a real-life figure of a coyote, and a humongous stuffed bear named Pooh. We participated in a group discussion about the overall mission of the sanctuary, facts about wolves, and numerous misconceptions humans have about the wolves. Their overall mission at the Wolf Conservation Center is to save wolves from completely going extinct and to teach people that wolves are more scared of us than we are of them. We learned that there are two types of wolves: red wolves and gray wolves. Baby wolves are born blind and deaf; and they gradually develop these two instincts as they begin to mature. We also learned that a main reason why humans are so scared of wolves is because they are used as antagonists in storybooks we read when we were younger such as “Little Red Riding Hood”, “Peter and the Wolf”, and “The Three Little Pigs”. In these tales, the wolves are the evildoers and are the enemy of the main character. These stories contribute to the continuing stigma that wolves are dangerous creatures that attack humans, which is completely untrue. Wolves are a crucial balance in nature. Without them, a whole bunch of animals will feel the shock waves from this interruption.
Afterwards, we howled like wolves to let them know that a whole bunch of us where going to visit them. We first met a five month old wolf named Nikai, who is scared of people (especially men) and never came close to the fence that separated us from him. The Conservation Center’s mission for Nikai is to train him so he could become a traveling wolf, which means that he would travel to different places and educate people that wolves pose no threat to human beings. The wolves would be brought to people who could not visit the Wolf Conservation Center. The next two wolves we visited were two brother and sister wolves named Zephyr & Alawa. Lois had a bucket of meat that the Center receives as donations from Whole Foods and fed the two eager hungry wolves. They were very excited to see us and howled back when Lois howled at them. They were way bigger than Nikai was, and they were more engaged with us as well. The final wolf we visited was a white furred wolf named Atka, who was also very large in size and completely captivated our attention. Lois also fed Atka and we found it amazing that Atka was able to crack an egg open and only eat what was inside of the egg. Out of the three, Atka was my favorite because he is a very intelligent and unique wolf, as well as a very alert animal. If I was a wolf, I would be exactly like Atka. Atka, as well as Zephyr & Alawa howled back when Lois howled at them; but it did take a little help from us to join Lois in howling along.
I was really sad leaving the Wolf Conservation Center. My favorite part of this trip was meeting Atka and the discussion that happened in the beginning of the trip at the cabin. It would be so wonderful if we could come back during the winter, while it was snowing. I would love to see wolves in the snow.
-Oscar, Phase II
Zoom Info

I have lived in New York City all of my life, which also means that I rarely leave her premises. On July 25th, nine Youth Corp interns and our four supervisors went on a trip to the Wolf Conservation Center located in South Salem, New York.

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On the first day of Summer Youth Corps 2014, all 6 Phase II mentors (and consultant Harris) sat down to create a vision statement for our summer program. A vision statement describes how we want our summer to go and says how we would like to see ourselves at the end of the session. We started the vision statement by coming up with things we want to let the Phase I interns to know and what we want to offer for them. For example, it is important to us that Phase I know that we are there for them and that they are comfortable working here with us. It took us a couple of drafts before we came up with our lovely vision statement. Our vision statement reads: “The Vision Statement of Phase II is to lead by example so that we can help others to become better contributors to the Park Avenue Armory community. We will guide Phase I to expand their creativity and knowledge , as well as provide our best opinion on how to face and overcome challenges. Ultimately, we will nurture the personal growth of phase I interns by creating a fun, comfortable, professional work environment.” 
We also created some activities to do with the new interns. We brainstormed some icebreakers, get-to-know-you games, and teamwork activities such as a slow motion race, human pretzel game, paper airplane toss, and others. We did these activities because we wanted to welcome the Phase I with positive energy and fun. We also created a poster of facts about Park Avenue Armory that it is important for the Phase I to know. 

My co-Phase II member Lilia and I were in charge of the Slow Motion Race and the Human Pretzel games. The slow motion race had three scenarios in which the Phase I and Phase II  had to work together to plan and perform a skit in which they accomplished a task in super slow motion. This was an important activity because it allowed everyone to work together as a team. The human pretzel was a pretty hilarious activity. We all grabbed hands across a circle and just ended up knotted with each other. Some of us were crawling on the floor, and there were people climbing over each others hands and people going under arms. Some of us ended up sweaty and drained. We totally didn’t finish unknotting ourselves but we definitely succeeded in working together. We all agreed to try it again until we get it right. That’s one thing about the Youth Corps: we never give up.

These activity was important to me and I left with something in mind that day: I had all these people that I had never even met all over me and I suddenly felt as if I’d known them for years. I have never felt as close, not only physically but emotionally close, to strangers. It made me feel great how all the new interns reacted with laughs and smiles, saying “lets do it again!” Our first Youth Corps day all together was a success! 

On the first day of Summer Youth Corps 2014, all 6 Phase II mentors (and consultant Harris) sat down to create a vision statement for our summer program.

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The Youth Corps ensemble is currently at work on the beginning stages of our upcoming performance piece inspired by Shakespeare’s play,Macbeth! Our purpose in creating this piece is to communicate the arc of emotions felt by the characters within play through movement and song. We are collaboration with artist Amy Neuner, who created the vocal portion of the performance, and Donna Costello, who is working on the movement portion of the piece. The ensemble will take the audience through an exciting and somewhat eerie journey inside Macbeth’s head and we look forward to the final product!

The Youth Corps ensemble is currently at work on the beginning stages of our upcoming performance piece inspired by Shakespeare’s play,Macbeth! Our purpose in creating this piece is to communicate the arc of emotions felt by the characters within play through movement and song. We are collaboration with artist Amy Neuner, who created the vocal portion of the performance, and Donna Costello, who is working on the movement portion of the piece. The ensemble will take the audience through an exciting and somewhat eerie journey inside Macbeth’s head and we look forward to the final product!

parkavenuearmory:

As an actor, the idea of coming to perform in New York is one of those things that you hope and pray and dream might be on your CV. I’m 53 years old and it hasn’t happened to me… until now.
—Kenneth Branagh

WATCH the singular Kenneth Branagh discuss his highly-anticipated New York stage debut as the Scottish king in Macbeth at the Armory. Previews begin May 31, 2014—will we see you there?

GET SCOTTISH HYPED!

Phase II Youth Corps, Tanai and Eric, present tips for working Front of House.

Phase II Youth Corps, Tanai and Eric, present tips for working Front of House.

The above photo captures families and Youth Crops participating in an MP3 experiment in the Veterans Room, following instructions of a disembodied voice. In the photo below, a family performs the radio play they wrote while an Armory Teaching Assistant records the powerful moment.
Zoom Info
The above photo captures families and Youth Crops participating in an MP3 experiment in the Veterans Room, following instructions of a disembodied voice. In the photo below, a family performs the radio play they wrote while an Armory Teaching Assistant records the powerful moment.
Zoom Info

The above photo captures families and Youth Crops participating in an MP3 experiment in the Veterans Room, following instructions of a disembodied voice. In the photo below, a family performs the radio play they wrote while an Armory Teaching Assistant records the powerful moment.

Last weekend I was given the awesome opportunity to photograph the Family Programming Workshop: Radio Drama: The History of Park Avenue Armory! Families worked together to learn about radio shows that took place throughout the Armory’s history and then were given the tools necessary to create their own. There were multiple stations ranging from a sound effects studio to an editing station that gave families a glimpse at what it is like to create, edit, and record their ideas into a radio pieces. Here are some heartwarming photos of families and the Youth Crops working together and having a great time!
Zoom Info
Last weekend I was given the awesome opportunity to photograph the Family Programming Workshop: Radio Drama: The History of Park Avenue Armory! Families worked together to learn about radio shows that took place throughout the Armory’s history and then were given the tools necessary to create their own. There were multiple stations ranging from a sound effects studio to an editing station that gave families a glimpse at what it is like to create, edit, and record their ideas into a radio pieces. Here are some heartwarming photos of families and the Youth Crops working together and having a great time!
Zoom Info

Last weekend I was given the awesome opportunity to photograph the Family Programming Workshop: Radio Drama: The History of Park Avenue Armory! Families worked together to learn about radio shows that took place throughout the Armory’s history and then were given the tools necessary to create their own.

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Creating sound effects at the Radio Drama: The History of Park Avenue Armory Family Programming.April 2014

Creating sound effects at the Radio Drama: The History of Park Avenue Armory Family Programming.
April 2014

Richard III… In Chinese?!!

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On Friday, March 28th, the Youth Corps had the opportunity to attend the National Theatre of China’s production of Richard III at NYU’s Skirball Center for the Performing Arts.  I was excited, yet skeptical, because I’m not much of a Shakespeare theatre goer.  So I did some research on it and discovered that the play contained acrobatics, and was in Mandarin.  But I decided to go anyway, and it was much different than I thought it would be.

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The xx: A Youth Corps Review

I’ve never attended a live concert before, let alone one performed by the xx, so you can imagine the excitement I felt when I, along with the rest of the Youth Corps, were given the chance to the xx perform live at Park Avenue Armory. 

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In our journey through dissecting William Shakespeare’s language in the play Macbeth, the Youth Corps worked on creating a “modern version” of Shakespeare’s text using Facebook as a template. We created Macbeth-themed “news feeds” on large poster paper. This is an example of Jo and Nancy’s news feed.

In our journey through dissecting William Shakespeare’s language in the play Macbeth, the Youth Corps worked on creating a “modern version” of Shakespeare’s text using Facebook as a template. We created Macbeth-themed “news feeds” on large poster paper. This is an example of Jo and Nancy’s news feed.